Swim Goggles, Thank You Cards, and YouTube. How Regaining a Sense of Control Can Make “Just Staying Home” a Little Less Scary.

Driving down the highway (before self-isolation of course) and seeing those big Atlas or Allied Van Lines 18-wheelers moving trucks has always given me a little jolt of excitement and a slight pang of jealously…someone is off on a grand adventure. I read the names of the companies listed on the trucks’ broad sides. OnceContinue reading “Swim Goggles, Thank You Cards, and YouTube. How Regaining a Sense of Control Can Make “Just Staying Home” a Little Less Scary.”

No Excuses

“She’s 10, right???,” was my sister’s sarcastic response upon reading my daughter’s email to her classmates. Yup, she’s 10 and she knows how to set clear expectations and hold people accountable. She acknowledged that her classmates have other priorities, or at least that one of them does. She itemized the tasks required and provided stores thatContinue reading “No Excuses”

We’ve Turned Childhood into a Competition and We’re all Losing

We are a competitive culture. In business school we are taught that we can’t fix it until we measure it. As a society, we are addicted to knowing where we rank—first, second, third—and to constant improvement in an effort to raise our scores. Since our kids were babies, we logged their first smiles, celebrated that magicalContinue reading “We’ve Turned Childhood into a Competition and We’re all Losing”

Dear Daughter, Please Don’t Ever Measure Yourself Against the Fake Perfectionism of Magazine Covers

“That’s airbrushed sweetie… she doesn’t really look like that,” I say to my seven-year-old. “Yes, I see that picture. Yes, the one on the cover of the magazine. Yes, she does look pretty. And she has on exercise clothes – yup, she exercises – that’s very good for her. Well, I want to show youContinue reading “Dear Daughter, Please Don’t Ever Measure Yourself Against the Fake Perfectionism of Magazine Covers”

Dirt, Drama, and Picking Teams: Recess Makes Better Kids

Last week I came upon one of my daughter’s white shirts, covered in brown goop of unknown origin. I figured that it was watercolor from art or some mystery sauce from lunch. Turns out, it was dirt and moss from ongoing fort-building that the fourth graders had undertaken at recess. The explanation went something likeContinue reading “Dirt, Drama, and Picking Teams: Recess Makes Better Kids”